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report is an update from julie labonty, wsip. >> good afternoon, the focus of wsip has been on the large change of the calaban project and the status of the program. i will give a brief update. on the calaban project, i am pleased to report that the director will sign the seqa for the site and the first permit approval received today. the contract observation hill is proceeding well, they are averaging 15,000 cubic yards a day, that is better than expected. the contractor did a good job of protecting the site and responding to the major storms that struck the bay area a couple of weeks ago. noah does remain a big challenge for us on that project. so far we have been able to control that issue. it's not impacted construction. but we definitely need to keep that issue as one of our top priority in the field. it's actually the third highest risk on this project. talking about risks in our december update, we will elevate our number 1 and number 2 risks on the project to the trend level. which means that the likelihood of those risks to materialize is becoming greater. which means we must s
. that is something that i think is really important. as julie manchin, there is a $35 consultation that is available -- as julie mentioned. >> any other questions? there are multiple languages available. vietnamese, tagalog, chinese. just to let you can receive assistance from some very qualified individuals. >> any other questions? if not, thank you very much for coming. [applause]
knowledge of christmas carols to the test. >> and julie scardina is here with a winter wonderland of animals. >> oh, a camel. oh, don't kiss that one. oh, do it, i dare you. >> oh! julie. >> and something else. >> they're adorable. we're having crepes for breakfast. >> all after your local news. >>> we're back with today's call of the wild and sea world and busch gardens ambassador julie scardina. >> she's here with a bunch of santa's helpers from around the world. you have the best group of animals today. we should point out. >> who do we have here? >> of course a lot of people don't realize it's warm in some places around the world when they're celebrating christmas. so we thought we'd start there. the place down under. this little joey, only six months old right now, but when he's full grown he's going to be about six feet tall and 150 pounds. >> will he be sweet by then or -- >> well, you know what's great is one of my favorite places at busch gardens is kangaloo where you can go and meet and feed the kangaroos. all of them have been conditioned to be around people. i know. he's at that
identities at dozens of area gas stations. julie watt shows us what the stations are doing. >> reporter: they are supposed to offer a bit of protection, security stickers slapped on gasp lien pump. in the sticker is broken, someone may have tried to open the machine. >> when i looked at my account, i saw a withdrawal for 300- dollar which i knew i had not made. >> reporter: this time last year, it happened to 300 customers at lucky supermarkets when crooks installed a few skimmers that went unnoticed for days. we saw some sticker, some cut, some peeled off. sign of tampering? >> not necessarily. >> we have not had any kind of skimmer devices put on any one of our equipment. >> reporter: he wants to put it that way. rotten robbie is joining others moving from low tech stickers to newer generation readers. >> once you try to get inside, it won't work. it's broken. >> reporter: joan at gas station card receiptors are one example of new technology spoke for a downturn in skimmer scan. >> the counter measures have really improved. >> like this pump that sounds an aalmost and kills the power
. the chargers are second-degree murder, assault, reckless endangerment july and child abuse. ware was found on the front steps with his 7-week-old kearri, asking someone to use their cell phone. he said he met stanton was making a strange noise like he was having trouble breathing. he tried to resuscitate him ware realized he was pushing too hard while doing cpr. he admitted holding his son and claimed as he tried to put the child into a playpen the boy fell out of his arms and kearri hit his side and fell to the hardwood floor. we're told he picked up his son and wiped his face and put him in the playpen. >> a store employee shot and killed someone who entered the store on baltimore and annapolis boulevard. the alleged intruder ran out of the store, collapsed and died at the scene. state police say a police officer was forced to shoot and kill a man wielding a hammer. it to happen during a confrontation with three officers. we have the latest in westminster. >> authority city officer who is a ford have year veteran -- four and a half year veteran shot the suspect. a phone call from one of
scott, julie christian son. >> good afternoon, mr. [speaker not understood]. nice to see you. >>> mr. chairman, director rifkin, thank you, and members. thank you for the seeking additional opinion and reach a resident opinion. my name is rod [speaker not understood]. i'm not here as a past president of the hill dwellers. i divert from the hill dweller's review on this one. no nor have the project members -- steve has eloquently given you purchase's position. nor as a past commissioner. you're a member of civic design for many years. i am currently a board member at renew sf and that opinion will be given by others. i'm here to support completion of the t-line from bayview to fisherman's wharf. as you say, that's not on your agenda today. that's really what this is all about. we have been working on that since the late 1960s. we have station designs from late 1967 offering the merchants of north beach rapid transit, grade separated service underground. four years ago we cautioned the central subway's engineers to avoid line and station construction that would obviously arouse strong
the index to the highest level since july. one bright spot though was on the housing front. the monthly case-shiller report found october home prices rose 4.3% compared with a year earlier. the data giving a late sign of recovery in the housing market is actually gaining traction. first our top story, president obama, cutting his vacation short, flying back to washington, d.c. tonight to work on a fiscal cliff deal. now, if the stakes weren't high enough, the treasury department upped ante just a short time ago. it announced the u.s. will hit the debt ceiling on december 31st that is monday. treasury department is undertaking and this is a quote, extraordinary measures to postpone the country's date with the debt deadline, but will this bring a new sense of urgency and motivate politicians to reach a budget deal. joining us now, lindsey piegza, economist with ftn financial and james freeman, assistant editor of "the wall street journal"'s editorial page. james, i will start with you. does the treasury department's statement literally within the last hour we'll hit the debt ceiling deadline o
. >> july 16th, 1969, show time. >> you think about the count down as the curtain opening worry is a wasted emotion. it clouds clear thinking that is absolutely needed when something goes wrong. >> the launch another stellar of fire was lost. three-day trip from the earth to the moon without insurance den the. >> we have a happy home. there's plenty of room for the three of us you. >> he coupled the lunar module from the command module and guided safely to the moovenlt on the way down armstrong and aldrin realized they were going long beyond the landing duck and into a boulder. that's when armstrong took over diverting from the plan he was now flying above unfamiliar territory searching for a safe spot to land while running low on fuel. >> we are on far side. looking at the altitude and it is about 100 feet. >> 60 seconds. >> 60 seconds. >> we are still a ways off the ground we have 60 seconds. i am getting concerned. >> we got very tense in mission control biteling our nails and holding our breath because we are running out of gas. i called eagle 30 seconds. 13 seconds later on the stopwat
. * generates in july 2012 mta issued revenue bonds which paid off the debt held by the corporation. subsequently the corporation requested that the lease be terminated and [speaker not understood] the duty that they currently have. so, the last few months the mta staff and the corporation worked on the termination agreement which is presented here for your review and approval. the approval of the agreement will [speaker not understood] effective december 31st. it will bring back the oversight of the garage to the mta. it will eliminate many of the services and save about 200,000 annually. the draft determination agreement has been approved by the corporation board in october 2012 and it has been approved by the mta board of directors yesterday. with that, i will be happy to take any questions that you may have. >> thank you very much. thank you for your presentation. we'll go on to the budget analyst report. mrs. campbell. >> okay. under the proposed resolution on termination of the lease agreement with downtown parking corporation, mta would assume all the administrative and overs
in july, early july, and today we're up 3.7% at 1928. however, look at a one--year chart of the dow comparing it to the vix. what often happens is when the vix peaks as it did in june and july, that can mark a bottom in the stock market so we're starting to move up again. i'm just saying. not trying to forecast anything and here's what happened today at the dow, sort of falling off here in the latter part of the hour but not off. off the lows of the day. down 21 points. material stocks were the strength today. up 1.5%. everybody else was either unchanged or lower. what do you make of the increased volatility or increased fear here, david darst, as we go into the end of the year? >> one of the best charts is the vix being high. it was a time to buy. in chicago that's a famous saying. when the vix is high it's time to buy. >> we high enough yet? >> not yet, not yet. got the fiscal cliff issues which you've talked about a lot here. >> yes, we have. >> jobs coming out on friday. morgan stanley looking for 185,000. basically the housing market, you had the case schiller numbers today. it
care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing
and cabinet in july 1962 great tapes include numerous discussions on topics of the day, including the q1 missile crisis in vietnam. this is about one hour. >> good evening, ladies and gentlemen. i am tommy nottingham the director of the jfk library foundation. tom putnam is the director of the presidential museum and i thank you all for coming here this evening. let me begin by acknowledging generous underwriters of the kennedy form, bank of america, boston capital, global institute, the boston foundation, and the media partners. tonight's forum is a very special one for those who work at the john f. kennedy library and the same. the publication of the "listening in", which is now on sale in our museum store, was simply not possible if not for the incredible skills and talent and professionalism and dedication of our library staff and government employees. there is one person in particular, one person that tom putnam and i would like to acknowledge. and it isn't archivist that has been overseeing the classification of these recordings and who knows more about these 265 hours of president
tragedy. >>> good evening merry christmas i'm ken wayne. >> and i'm jana katsuyama, frank and julie have this christmas off. >> we're on storm watch as another storm rolls through the area. we have team coverage of this latest system. bill martin is tracking on storm tracker 2. but we begin with john fowler he's like in palo alto and brings us why people are keeping an eye on a levee. >> reporter: because it's raining. you may see some spots on your lens. let me show you san franciscito bridge. it is much higher than when you last saw it. there's 3,700 sandbags here. state crews brought in 3,500 of these sandbag, built some so called chimneys to protect the levee from erosion from beneath. the idea here is that this is a temporary fix for a 82-year-old problem here. and just a little while ago the officials for the joint powers authority told me that the rain tonight should not be enough to push the creek to the near record flows of two nights and and across the bay we found people enjoying tonight's rain. >> it is, it is. it's going to hopefully bring a lot of freshness, right to the va
>>> happy holidays i'm julie haener. each year at this time we showcase the talent and creativity of our photo journalists. through their lens they bring us the spirit of the season. we're here at christmas in the park in san jose not far from where our first story takes place. the tragedy prompted a south bay family to give rather than receive. joe and judy santiago set out to spread holiday cheer with just a box of candy canes. 29 years later the santiago's generosity continues to grow. >> we need one more. >> oh, gosh, what a deal. >> can you check if we have more of these in the back. >> we have this down to a science now. >> a little girl would be happy with a pink monkey. >> we keep track of them. >> by boys and girls, by age, by year. >> three, two, one. >> yay. >> the gifts we give out are from infants to 14 years old. >> last year we had 15 carts loaded up with gifts. >> you people are so awesome we really appreciate this. >> the kids just love meeting santa. >> he's excited to meet santa claus right now. >> ho, ho, ho, merry christmas. >> the family gets their picture ta
that off the bridge and the u.s. open and the pride parade. and then we took a brief break in july and in august started with some of our exercising as part of the fleet week activity and i highlight some of those here, so with the america cup's races which we had been planning for starting at the beginning of the year. three successful exercises in preparation for the first week of racing that took place in august and continued in october and as the mayor mentioned october was incredibly busy for us with america's cup and the fleet week activities we had going on, to additional exercises. we had a senior leader seminar and a disaster aid presentation on marina green. other things that took place that the mayor mentioned the bluegrass and castro street parade and a finer and giants game and lead to the playoffs and all happened on the same day so when we go we definitely go big. after those activities we had the annual shake out drill, one of the largest demonstrations of the public what their responsibilities are to be ready and we rolled into the playoffs and the world series
supposedly on evidence newly dissolved and it's based on a permanent discover in july if there is new evidence it's unclear why it cannot be discovered and entered in tonight's hearing and all of the information should be gathered by now and he is not preclude first degree entering new evidence in possession and he can proceed tonight he should be required to proceed tonight and he should not receive more time to get out from under the city's jurisdiction. . >> ms. kaiser is there anyway is that we can satisfy you with respect to the jurisdictional issue that you place voice? >>> i'm not sure what you are asking. >> is there anyway to avoid the concern that you have raised and to the extent i'm not familiar with the legal requirements of the practitioners and therefore, i'm not -- like you are going to have to give us briefing on the jurisdictional issue and how it is that the delay could in fact, i mean if a more plausible circumstances? >> it's arguable. >>> the 60 cities going to dispute that it's jurisdiction to impose a penalty for an act that took place when the practi
with this for years due to the memo in jean -- 1991. in july, 1989 memo dealt with the option to deal with the contaminated soil of the crystal lease water at lake merced. the reason for referencing this option is to provide you with a solution so we can move forward to build a much-needed boat house. and encapsulate soil without waiting another eight to 10 years. we cannot wait for eight to 10 years. here is a recommendation for the boat house, i have a bid that is less than your watershed report. what is not included in the landscaping and bathroom and an apron that goes in front. conclusions, let's get started in the new boat house, please no delays. the use is issue, the use issue has already been aggressively debated and studied. thank you. >> mr. moore. >> my name is dick morgan, i have been engaged in lake merced for 13 years. and i have spent thousands of volunteer hours on lake merced. when i first got engaged it was about 10 to 12 feet deep. it was rapidly going to a lake merced mud flat. there was denial and delay by commissioner and staff at that time. only when cal-pal br
strategist and a former campaign aide for president george w. bush, julie roginsky is former political adviser to new jersey senate frank lautenberg. good to see you both. >> good to see you. gregg: didi, smoot-holly was passed decades ago for the purpose of putting tariff limits on incoming products. do we need to reexplore that? >> yeah. this was, this was back in the '60s. i mean, this was ancient history. why should these workers who get paid very well also get on top of that the booty of $15-$16,000 more. for what? this is just an extra fee and extra goodies per container. what this was back in the '60s was a way to help there be more workers, it was a deal done with the unions and the ports so they wouldn't use as much equipment and so they wouldn't be as efficient so they could keep their union workers. it's outdated, and it's wrong and, really, it's terrible -- gregg: julie, what do you think? >> i think if we're talking about smoot-holly which is a different issue just raised by didi, but, yeah, i think the president will probably intervene, and he did last time on the west co
's electrical demand from renewable energy sources from july 15, 2012, through june 15, 2013. >> thank you very much. >> supervisors, guillermo [speaker not understood] with the department of environment. the department encourages the committee to approve and recommend the accept and expend grant from the sidney e. frank foundation for $250,000. the grant will enable the department of the environment to continue developing plans for san francisco to be 100% of its electricity demand from renewable energy qu sources. * meet currently the city-wide profile is 41% renewable. the department will draw upon recommendations contained in a recently completed mayor's renewable energy task force report. among the supported programs will be initiatives to expand in city renewables, primarily solar systems, advance regulatory changes to accelerate implementation of renewable projects, encourage community-based systems, and promote energy efficiency in san francisco. other strategies we will use include stakeholder consultations, working in partnership with pg&e and sfpuc to implement new programs that wou
and the superintendent of san francisco unified, just started in the summer of july. prior to that he was the deputy superintendent of innovation and social justice. [applause] next to richard is nancy o'malley, district attorney for alameda county. she was appointed in 2009 and elected in 2010 and has an amazing background dealing dealing with violence against women and domestic violence, elder abuse, child abuse and threat management. she's a wonderful addition to our panel so thank you nancy. [applause] next to nancy is tony smith who i loved his biobest of all and started he's an oakland resident and parent of students in oakland public schools. he was -- became the superintendent in 2009. he's a local boy including university of california berkeley background where he was captain of the football team and he did not include this in the biobut i know it and he wrote his under graduate thesis on emily dickon son so he's kind of a renaissance dude and he's 6-foot something. next to him is -- [applause] and next to him is george gaston and elect to the district attorney of the city and county o
district in july of this year, we're very lucky to have him. he stepped into this position after serving for 3 years as deputy superintendent of instruction, innovation and social justice for our district. he's been a teacher of bilingual social studies and moo*ufk, as i said, you can really tell, a high school principal and school superintendent in nevada. richard's passion lies in advancing educational equity and opportunity for all and we are very lucky to have him here with us here in san francisco. our superintendent of schools, richard karunda >> melinda, thank you so much for that wonderful introduction. i want to welcome you all to a sunny september morning in san francisco, i hope you have your sun block and i also want to welcome home our lieutenant governor, our former mayor, gachb newsom. it's good to see you, sir. yesterday was a really powerful experience for us in san francisco. we've made a commitment that by the end of october every 6th through 12th grader in san francisco city public schools will have had the opportunity to see bully and not only view that documenta
of comments. laura cooper wrote in saying the elves did it. julie bruce, this will not keep me from eating candy canes. barbara saying, mom, a little help here. kristin hutchinson, if rudolph can do it, so can i. and cheryl hue et, you light up my life, please keep your captions coming and i do need some photos to use for later this week, so e-mail yours to pix@wmar pix@wmar.com. megan and charley, over to you. >> thanks, lauren. >>> a woman in santa fe, new mexico is proving her love for santa claus with a jaw-dropping collection. two inflatable santas are the only decorations outside jerry gonzalez' home. but take a step inside, all you're going to see is jolly old st. nick. gonzalez got her first santa claus as a gift from her father when she was just 10 years old. so in the past 20 years with the help of her husband, gonzalez' collection has multiplied. she has more than 1500 santa clauses. >> he represents the giving spirit of christmas for me. everything he does represents happiness and giving and just being with family, being with friends and that's what christmas is to meat santa
not remember them in any of the pictures. it was julie, david, and my parents walking them out. my dad came into the oval office with they had moved us children. you could just see this sadness. it was almost as if you had been to a funeral and there was a death. you did not know what to say. it was a very awkward moment of what do you say. we came together as a family knowing we were headed up to the east room where he would be sworn in, which of course was a very joyous moment to see your father, but what a sad moment for the american people. >> the question that i think probably everyone secretly asks themselves when they meet you is what is it like to grow up in the white house? a kid's perspective on a day-to- day living standpoint. what are your rooms like? >> first thing is it became my room. i wanted to know who else had been in my room. [laughter] so i asked the curator. he said, well, i can't think of anybody famous. [laughter] and so, then, i asked president eisenhower. who slept in this room when you were here? he said i think queen elisabeth lady in waiting was there. [laughter
experience. i've also visited libya -- >> in july? >> i visited in july but i also visited in september after the attack on benghazi. so i can speak to my own experience. you know, went secretary clinton said all of his senior leaders in the department are accountable and responsible for what happened at it certainly felt myself. ihop the remains of my former colleagues back after the attack in benghazi. had been in the middle east on a trip and cut short to come back with them. and all that long flight home i certainly have a lot of time to think about sharper questions that i could've asked, sharper focus that i could have provided. spent on your visit in july or september, did you -- >> july, yes. >> did that issue come up? did the folks on the ground say to you we are really worried about what's happening here with security? we've made a number of requests? >> there was no specific question about that. i did talk to ambassador stevens about the security situation but we didn't talk about specifics at the time. >> secretary clinton met with the prime minister in march with -- you know if t
while broadening the base. david: all right. now, that was in july of 2011 and then a couple of week-- a couple of months later came out with the budget, saying the tax system should be simplified and work for all americans with lower rates and brackets. the president has come out time and again saying we shouldn't raise any kind of rates. is anybody calling him on that? >> well, a lot of republicans are wondering what's different now? we still have a sluggish economy, why the change in position? , but the president was out on the campaign trail, time and time again saying individuals and families specifically making over $250,000 a year should be-- should get tax increases so he's sticking to that position, like i mentioned before, the white house seems to be signaling that they would move in the direction of 400,000, those making over 400,000 increases there which may be something that congress could agree on and get through. but again, we're going to have the conservative wave in the republican house saying no increases, so, boehner's going to be in in a position do i get democrat
$8 million from youtube ads, eye tunes downloads, even commercials. since july the video has had close to 9 million views which is even more than justin bieber. love it. >> i love it. i love --. melissa: i'm staring at it. >> my 8-year-old nephew, he brings the house down every time. that thing comes on and he goes crazy. i don't know what it means. don't know any word of the song. melissa: bet you can't do that dance. >> in the shower,o?
of deductions going to the simpson-bowles type of thing. let's play a sound from him in july 2007. play the sound bite, i will get your reaction. >> give us 1.2 trillion in additional revenues which could be accomplished without hiking taxes for tax rates but could be accomplished by eliminating loopholes and eliminating some deductions, and engaging in a tax reform process that could have lowered rates while broadening the base. david: without hiking tax rates. a couple months later he came out with his 2012 budget in which he said the tax system should be simplified. it worked for all americans with lower individual and corporate tax rates and fewer brackets. what changed his mind? >> he came out after the election saying he wanted 1.6 trillion in tax hikes, and his election kind of made him go for something figure. even though that meant he couldn't get an agreement. my personal view he does not want an agreement with republicans, he wants us to go over the fiscal cliff because republicans will get flamed and we will have a different scenario with the lowest rate not being 10%, but 1
, on the floor we call it the growth dividend. if you look at a chart for our ten-year starting on july 26th, and i pick july 26th because that was mario draghi's big day. he said anything it takes. as you look at our rates over that period, then look at the boon rates over that period. you can see that the growth/disparity, our yields are higher in that formation than boon yields, because even though funding issues have been largely contained since that july 26th day, we can still see that the prospects for growth may be reflected in these charts, as the prospects for growth are larger in the u.s., fiscal cliffs issues would make it larger. foreign exchange, mainly everybody on this post-holiday, light volume session, seems to have one eye on the yen. whether it's against the u.s. currency, the dollar/yen or euro/yen. both patterns look more aggressive on the dollar side. obviously abe as prime minister is going to bring along with him the largest printing press we can remember recently. and that, of course, will start a chain reaction and maybe other printing presses will run a little fast
. sweltering heat baked the nation this summer. march and july set u.s. records as the hottest of all time. number seven, western wildfire. >> oh, my god. there's smoke in the air. >> a heat wave helped fuel a string of wildfires that charred the west. colorado experienced two of the state's largest and most destructive wildfires ever. number six, the derecho in june. >> it began in iowa, moved through illinois, indiana, ohio and moved into washington, d.c. it's just a fast-moving, longlasting violent thunderstorm complex. >> after charging 800 miles, 22 were dead and 5 million were without power. number five, the dallas 22. there's an old myth that tornadoes don't hit big cities. >> it was so scary. remind you of "the wizard of oz" when the tornado hit and everything going around and around. >> caused nearly $1 billion worth of damage within 24 hours. number four, deadliest tornadoes. >> take it away from us, lord. >> tornadoes took up three slots in our top ten countdown. but this was the deadliest. march 2nd and 3rd, 70 confirmed tornadoes killed 7 people in the northwest. hurricane isa
the arkansas up the river in mississippi and it came down all by itself and attacked the union fleet in july of 1862. the confederates had gotten two raider, the florida and the alabama, built in britain, and they were being loosed on the seas now in the summer and fall of 1862. the union navy had captured galveston in october 1862 but the confederates counter-taked on new year's day and drove them out. so the momentum of the war had seemed to be reversed. and it took awhile before it would swing back in the union favor again. >> craig, jim mentioned haleck's reluctance to involve himself. walk house the development of the understanding of the urgent need for joint operations? >> i was just going to say the broader question behind this is the fact there was no protocol no understanding, and very little experience in the history of the united states that would allow the navy and the army to work as partners on a single team. we have to remember that the national security act of 1947 is a post-world war ii phenomenon that create third joint chiefs of staff, secretary of defense. during the civ
"under god" were added to the pledge of allegiance, it he proclaimed the fourth of july and national day of prayer. on that day, eisenhower fished in the morning, golfed in the afternoon, and played bridge in the evening. there were prayers -- perhaps when the chief executive faced a daunting putt. this was not his first foray into the darkened ground of the relationship between religion and american politics. three days before christmas in 1952, president elect ike made a speech in which he said "our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in the deeply felt religious faith and i do not care what it is." he received a much ridicule from his cultured despise years. his professed indifference to the major of the religious faith. it is the first part of the statement that deserves continuing attention. certainly many americans, perhaps the majority of them, agreed that democracy or at least our democracy, which is based on a belief in natural rights, presupposes religious faith. people believe this that all people are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights. t
legislation passed back in july, which would extend the bush tax cuts for everyone making under $250,000 a year. that that would be a vehicle for trying to get all of this done. there are a lot of other things out there like that expiring payroll tax cut. it looks like that will not get renewed. a whole pile of things. lori: a pile of what? [ laughter ] i could not resist. it is the day after christmas. >> happy new year's. tracy: it surely wasn't a holly jolly christmas for netflix users. 27 million without streaming service. shibani joshi here with the details. shibani: 27 of its 30 million customers did not have service on a knife that is very important for people. they want to watch a movie and not watch a christmas story for the 100th time. there was a blackout on amazon service. they were blocking people from getting access to movies and television shows. it was through numerous devices. there was just no way to get the context. you have to watch television or talk to your family. [talking over each other] shibani: we are finding out whose problem it really is. a lot of finger-
rank in the foreign service career ambassador and became deputy secretary of state in july of 2011. she is only the second serving career diplomat in history to become deputy secretary and ambassador burns served from 2008 to 2011 as undersecretary for political affairs as assistant secretary of state for near eastern affairs from 01 to 05 and and esther jordan from 08 to 2001. ambassador burns served in a number of other posts in the foreign service in '82 and putting the executive secretary of the state department and a special assistant secretary to christopher albright and acting director of principal deputy director of the state department policy planning staff. ambassador burns is the recipient of the two presidential distinguished service awards and a member of department of state awards and all well learned. thank you. thomas nides is the deputy secretary of state for management and resources serving as the chief operating officer of the department. prior to joining the administration, mr. nides was the chief operating officer of morgan stanley from 2005 to 2010 before joining m
as a public service by your television provider. -- julie watches c-span on verizon. washington journal continues. host: joining us on indianapolis is doug wissing, author of "funding and the enemy." we are talking about afghanistan and the end game. first, the title of your book that you wrote this year, how u.s. taxpayers bankrolled the taliban, remind us of what you were right thing? -- were writing. guest: i am sorry. i'm getting feedback in my earphone. if you could come off my audio, thank you. when i was imbedded with u.s. soldiers in afghanistan, i began to realize that the soldiers were trying to explain to me that there was a toxics system that was connecting distracted american officials, -- i'm sorry, i'm back to getting this in my ear phone. host: we will see if they can fix it. if you can try to continue, we will try to fix it. guest: there was a toxic network, hearing myself twice simply does not work. there was a toxic network that was connecting distracted american officials, u.s. corporations, military- industrial and development and industrial complex corporations, co
resource for anyone looking to become more familiar with how government works and capitol hill. >> julie watches c-span on verizon, c-span created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought as a public service by your television provider. [applause] >> justice anthony kennedy spoke at the heritage some asian as a part of a lecture series called preserve the constitution. he said it's the duty of every american to fulfill the constitution. he was introduced by the former attorney general's. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and gentlemen. it's great for me to be able to join john and welcome you here to this lecture. this is the fifth annual occasion on which we have had this lecture and i'm sure you all know the heritage foundation vision is to build an america where freedom, opportunity, prosperity and civil society flourished. to help achieve this, the center for legal and judicial studies launched the preserve the constitution series, which is an annual lecture series to inform and educate citizens on topics related to the constitution and the rule of law. the preserved constitution s
including the latest crash involving a bullet train which killed 40 people. remember that? july. patti ann: well, anxiety is rising over big tax hikes and spending cuts set to kick in on january 1st. a growing number of lawmakers saying they are skeptical that a deal can be reached in five days to avoid the fiscal cliff, especially with the main sticking point coming down to whether to increase taxes for top earners next year among many other things. byron york, now, of "the washington examiner" joins us to talk about this. good morning, byron. >> good morning, patti ann. patti ann: so we're going to show a full scream of what would happen if -- full screen of what would happen if we go off that fiscal cliff. but you got democrats, including congressman john yarmouth of kentucky, saying, look, we may go off that cliff on january 1st, but we would creak it very quickly -- correct it very quickly thereafter, so do you believe that's the democratic plan? enter yes, and it's a republican nightmare. republicans have been reached no deal's reached, barack obama and democrats immediately propose
. number eight, summer heat wave. sweltering heat baked the nation this summer. march and july set u.s. records as the hottest of all time. number seven, western wildfires. >> smoke in the air. >> the heat wave helped fuel a string of wildfires that hit the west. number six, the deratio in june. >> it began in iowa, moved through illinois, indiana, ohio and moved into washington, d.c. it took a fast moving long lasting violent thunderstorm complex. >> after charging 800 miles, 22 were dead and 5 million were without power. number five, the dallas 22. there is an old myth that tornadoes don't hit big cities. april 3rd proved otherwise when twisters hit dallas. >> scary. it was so scary. it reminds you of the wizard of oz when the tornado hit and everything just going around and around. >> 22 tornadoes caused a billion dollars worth of damage in 24 hours. number four, deadliest tornado. tornadoes took up three spots in our top ten countdown, but this event was the deadliest. march 2nd and 3rd, 70 confirmed tornadoes killed 40 people in the midwest. number three, hurricane isaac. hurric
and put our initial application in april and then it was a lot of back-and-forth. and until july when they finally said that they would give us access to. but then we didn't get access to it and we still haven't received access to it. now in all fairness, at bat -- inhofe late august we were sued by the aclu that we didn't prevent us from being a will to get access to the database what we would be able to do with it after that point and we haven't received access to the database. the discussions have just basically gone bats appointing because we are trying to do the right thing. we don't want to accuse somebody that is assisting the united states that they are not able to vote and they are not a citizen. that same database gives us time and information on individual citizenship and would allow us to make sure to have the 3,500 eda two that we would be able to find out that who is a citizen and who isn't. we know what least six of those individuals were not citizens because the department of investigation did find that out through the investigative work that takes a lot of time we wou
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